Painting a Work of Art


Painting a Work of Art

I will hold you in my arms
In my mind
In my heart

I will paint with vivid colors
Through my life
A work of art

Do you think of your life as a work of art? I know I’ve touched on this before in the area of poetry, but I would like to touch on this now in the form of art in general. Yes, I believe that our lives are like poems. Some are sad. Some are intense. Some are flowery. Some are light. Some are dark. I like to think of mine as a plethora of experiences – emotional, intellectual, physical and spiritual. Holistic in a sense.

Albert Einstein said, “Only a life lived for others is a life worth living.” Wow. What do you think of that? I think it’s a pretty darn powerful statement. It seems so counter-culture for our modern times, where personal peace, affluence and the quest of ‘being happy’ and collecting things for personal gain seem to be high on humanity’s priority list.

These two cuties above are my children. I wrote this little poem (if you’d like to call it that) about them.Β Western culture seems to demean a woman staying home with her children, and not being realized professionally, as something bad. As a waste of life. As if she’s making herself and her life less than what it could be. I don’t see it that way. I see it as a life fulfilled. A life with far less stress and rushing about. A life of more tranquility, peace and fulfillment in what I invest in.

Yes, I think Albert Einstein just may have been right. After all, he was considered an amazing genius.

What are you investing your life in? Are you painting a picture of vivid colors? How are you doing so? Do you believe that a woman is ‘throwing her life away’ by staying with her children and investing in their good? Do you think she is a woman that is unfulfilled in life?

Advertisements

51 thoughts on “Painting a Work of Art

  1. What beautiful children, Staci! There is nothing more important, nor more honorable than someone who sacrifices their professional career for the sake of their children. When my life comes to an end, I will be comforted by the children that I helped raise, and not by board members of some corporation that I worked for. I can live with that. πŸ™‚

    • Awww, thanks Rob. In a way, they are part of my career. I just think it’s a little sad that so many people in western culture cringe at the thought of a woman raising her kids. I guess culture shapes people’s mentality, and oftentimes, people can get sooooooooo opinionated even about others’ choices. A little strange, don’t you think. For me, I used to have a really twisted view on motherhood, raising children, women in general. Over time my thoughts have done an (almost) 380 degree turn around.
      Soooo glad that you have high values when it comes to raising and being a positive influence in your childrens’ lives Rob.
      πŸ™‚

  2. I love your little poem and agree wholeheartedly with your belief. We have been fortunate that my wife has been able to stay at home and paint into our four girls’ lives as well.

  3. Aww, that picture! ❀ ❀
    And, the lines you've written compliment it so well, it's such a profound thought that we can colour others' lives just by being in it, so powerful and delicate at the same time.
    I think that there is so much to learn, that β€˜throwing her life away’ is just not an option, is it? We learn so much from kids, I am often astonished at the questions they ask and the things they make us feel/wonder about. If 'the world' wants to equate that with the dynamics of money then I guess they'll have to refer to some Physics – 'Every action has an equal and opposite reaction.' if a woman decides to spend her life taking good care of her children and if that equates to her happiness then there will be a ripple effect somewhere, in the children or in the people around her, in the society, a person who is typing this, a person who sees her genuine smile, everything is inter-related, in the end it makes a difference, it will have a reaction, a lot positive than it was when it started. The 'real world' can be judgmental but all it fears is the energy such people, who live for others, carry within themselves. I'd love to do that if I ever could.
    Wow, that was quite the lecture, tea time calls! πŸ˜€

    • Hahahahaha, lecture eh. Yes, tea time indeed. But it’s great what you shared here. I remember reading a post once from Kenneth, The Culture Monk, where he shared a story of a barista at a coffee shop that was leaving her job to be at home with her kids. From what I remember from the post, or from what I understood of it, was that people in general thought she was throwing her life away. As if a woman being a mother and raising her children was the most horrible thing she could ever do. Hmmmmm. Very interesting how culture shapes the mentality of a people over time.
      πŸ™‚

      • It is indeed. But, people just tend to label everyone. Like I am “the girl who needs psychological help”, and I don’t know how that can be stopped.
        Being a caring mother, I think, is one of the purest forms of affection and in no way horrible, but most people won’t understand that even if they pretend to.
        It’s very unfair to those who decide to go for their children over their careers. 😐

      • Oh really. Hahaha. I laugh because I think most of need psychological help, including me. I actually started to see a psychologist, but we will be moving, and I’m not sure that she’s the type of psychologist I really want to see. As for now, I take meds and I’m fine. I don’t take them, and I’m not. Don’t sleep. Very irritated. Emotions all over the place. Anxious. I can’t eat slowly. Hyper like crazy. Who knows? So, I say all this, my friend, so that you know that you’re not alone. At least one other blogger friend who thinks you’re awesome is in the same boat as you. πŸ™‚ We’ll just sip our tea and eat our cookies and muffins together, and talk about all the people that don’t think they need psychological help (they’re in denial, if you ask me – hehehehehe. Just kidding.)
        πŸ™‚ ❀

  4. First of all, so darn cute those two are, Staci!! Aww! Second, I think raising children is one heck of a full-time commitment. A beautiful gift and one to be envious of, in my opinion. I’m a fan of any choice a woman makes if she’s doing it for the right reasons. I have two sisters who both work outside the home and are better mothers for doing so, but they both wish they had the strength to stay home and raise their children full-time . I think it is important to remember we all have our strengths. Motherhood is tough and a job to cherish. As a teacher, I see children thriving on either side, but more often than not the kids who need some rest and a hug are those whose mothers are working too much at something other than their family. I find that sad. I think those 20 years will fly by and will leave plenty of time for other adventures once they’ve grown. Plus, one hell of a resume for the lady who can say she raised two healthy well rounded kids who can’t wait to live life based on what Mom taught them.

    • Awwww, thanks Audrey. I think they’re cute too πŸ™‚
      Yes, it is a full-time commitment, but I don’t find it overbearing at all.
      “I’m a fan of any choice a woman makes if she’s doing it for the right reasons. ”
      –I love that you mentioned this. That’s just it. I, in no way believe that all women need to stay home with their children all day long and all. I just think it’s sad that western culture thinks that a woman oftentimes is throwing her life away if she does. As if it’s the ultimate sacrifice and a heavy burden. For me, it is a heavier burden to not be there for them, and to not be the one influencing their lives. I don’t have anything against working, and so many women need to because of the economy and other circumstances in their lives.
      Did you read Kenneth’s post about the barista that had decided to quit her job so that she could be home with her kids? And the reaction of the people? And how she felt the need to explain herself, that she was going to get her masters (or something like that)? Funny thing how culture really shapes the mentality of a people, wouldn’t you say? And then some people just get downright nasty and fundamentalist about he whole issue. As if to say that women that stay home with their kids are just ridiculous and are throwing their lives away. Hmmmmmmmm. I used to feel somewhat the same way. Over time, God really changed (literally transformed) my way of thinking. I couldn’t be happier.
      “more often than not the kids who need some rest and a hug are those whose mothers are working too much at something other than their family. I find that sad.”
      –Me too. And that’s just it. Are they working too much to find their place in society? How has their worldview been shaped when it comes to kids and raising kids? Are their kids important enough to them to care for their well-being? Because kids know if they’re valued or not. What are we saying to them when our focus and attention is on our work more than on them?
      Thank you so much Audrey for sharing what you did. I appreciate you sharing your experiences as a teacher as well, because you see up front what a lot of children go through.
      πŸ™‚

      • I remember reading Kenneth’s post. I remember also being very happy for her choice to stay home. I think that if it is an ootion women should stay invested in their children. I know a lot of woman who have tried and failed at doing it successfully, because they just aren’t equipped to handle the pressures. I cannot stand seeing woman or society tear woman down for the choices we make as capable adults. Passing judgement on each other surely hinders a teamwork mentality. Supporting one another is key. I think what you have been called to do is a blessing. Enjoy every moment. Our kids will remember having mom around and they will be better humans for it. Truly.

      • Awwww, thanks Audrey. I think it’s sad that women, especially in a western context undergo so much pressure concerning this. I’m not sure how I would handle it if I was around it. I really am so thankful that I’m not. It really is so much easier to live a simple life, with the values I have, where I’m at right now.
        Thanks for the encouragement too. I will enjoy every moment. I don’t know if I told you this or not, but we have decided to take our son out of the schooling system here and homeschool. Brazil (or at least where we are) just seems so ill-equipped to handle children with Asperger’s. We’ll be using an online curriculum that lays it all out for you, and many parents have already gone this way with their Asperger’s children. We are also moving back to our home base, which is huge and has a lake, mico monkeys, trees, kids, hills, and tons of space. My son absolutely loves it there, which makes it that much easier with this decision we’ve made.
        Thanks again Audrey.
        πŸ™‚

      • I’ll be keeping you guys in my prayers, Staci. You are a gift. Your children are blessed to have you for a mother. I think you’re doing the best for your son. He will get a better education away from the labeling, as well. You know your son better than anyone, and although you will have a tough days, his life experiences through your home schooling will triple his ability to navigate in this world. I promise you that… Celebrate everything milestone no matter how long it takes. Enjoy the experience and take your time, my friend. Maybe see if you can find some social moments with other kids with Aspergers, too. I’m sure you have looked into that already. I have two kiddos this year that are fairly high functioning, but need their mothers with them daily. It would be best for them. I’ll pray for guidance and strength during your transition. Your home base sounds fantastic. ..wow. Who wouldn’t live it there…

      • Thank you so much for your kind words and prayers Audrey. I truly do appreciate them and appreciate you.
        Yea, the labeling is a funny thing too. I really want to stay away from the whole, ‘he’s so different’ type of thing. I really don’t see him like that. Nor do I see him as limited. I just think he, like so many kids, need an education plan that is personalized for him. Have you by any chance seen the Ted x Talk by Ken Robinson about schools and creativity? I was blown away by it. Sure he has his obsessions. Sure he speaks non-stop about what he’s obsessed about. But I think it’s funny and cute. Anyhow, there’s this one other kid (2 years older than Caue) at the base that is suspected Asperger’s or high functioning. We have a close relationship with his parents (actually, the man is my hubby’s cousin), so that’s a good thing.
        Thanks again Audrey.
        πŸ™‚ ❀

    • Hi Soapie. Great hearing from you. And yes, I am a huge Einstein fan. Even more so since I found out that he is suspected as having Asperger’s Syndrom (like my son).
      I had never read that John Piper quote. Thanks for sharing it.
      Hope you’re doing well.
      πŸ™‚

  5. I love love love that you are home with you children!!!! πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ When I was tiny I had to go to a nanny’s house while my mother worked, and it was horrible!!! I just cried and cried and spent the day being sad, oh, that feeling of abandonment! I can still feel it so fresh in my heart! So I feel so sad when I see children being put away (againts their will) in day care and with nannies. I mean some children dont mind, and some mums have to work, so I dont mean to judge it either, I just feel so happy when I hear about mums like you who are staying home with their children! πŸ™‚ I dont really care much for money or career, I just want to be a light in the world, I want to make everyone feel loved, especially children and young people, so that they grow up feeling safe embracing joy and happiness, and then when that happens the world will change, I think, and perhaps become the world I dream of, a world built on Love and compassion and joy! πŸ™‚

    Oh, and your children are so so so super-cute!!! πŸ™‚ Completely adorable!! πŸ™‚ You are so blessed to have each other! πŸ™‚ and I love that little poem too! πŸ™‚

    Lots and lots of Love to you and your entire lovely family! ❀ ❀ ❀

    • Awwww, thanks so much Trini. I’m so sorry to hear about your bad experiences growing up. You are such a sensitive person, and I’m so sorry to hear that you sensed that abandonment. I know that there are a lot of mothers that really have no choice, but to work. But I’m am all for staying with your kids if you’re able to. It’s such a huge responsibility having children. Parents need to understand that. Because you are shaping, raising and caring for little humans that will one day grow up. Who is going to influence their lives? Who is going to give them all that they need, be it physically, mentally, emotionally…? Did you know that if a baby is bathed, changed, fed, etc, but is not shown love, that baby will die? (Did I mention that to you before?) Anyhow, raising children is a huge responsibility and not one that I plan to take lightly.
      Thank you soooo much Trini for sharing your heart and for your kind words.
      Lots and lots of love to you and may your time in Singapore be amazing.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

  6. So you do write prose and do it well I might add! Your children are adorable! I think if a woman can and wants to being a stay at home mom is great. A calling is a calling, regardless of the pay or circumstance. Hugs and love, N πŸ™‚ ❀

    • Hahahahaha. Was that prose? Thank you so much Natalie. You’re so sweet.
      Thank you for your kind words about my children too. I also think they’re adorable. hehehehe.
      My life is totally different, far from the norm. I am a missionary with YWAM, and have been since 2002. Sooooo, I do stay with my kids, but I am still involved in missions, and so is my hubby. However, I consider myself privileged to be able to do so. I used to have a really warped and unhealthy view of what it meant to be a woman, and what it meant to raise children. When we were living in India for a bit, I used to go for walks first thing in the morning and listen to podcasts. I started to listen to some on women and proverbs (no, not prov 31. hehehe), and WOW! That’s all I can say. God did a major work in my mind and heart. He totally ripped out an unhealthy worldview that I had and showed me that it wasn’t a lifestyle to be despised. Anyhow, it was a very personal and real experience I had with God, and I’m so happy for it.
      Hugs and love to you N.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

    • Awwww, thanks Laurie. I know you love being a mom, and I’m so happy you do. I love that you and your daughter did those collages together with your mom too. Just lovely.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

  7. Oh my goodness…so precious!! Your babies are incredibly cute…and I say BRAVO!! What you are doing is one of the hardest…yet most rewarding jobs in the world!! ❀

    • Awwww, thanks so much Lorrie. I love my babies to pieces. And I used to have a horrible worldview when it came to being a woman, and being a mother. Thank God my mentality has changed, and for the better. Yes, it is a tough job, but there’s joy in the journey. Much joy and much reward.
      Thank you, once again my sweet friend.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

  8. You have wonderful children Staci… incredibly cute as said Lorrie!!! And you ask so important questions, I will answer later… since I’m enjoying one week in sunny Sicily… so much mediterranean love to you πŸ™‚ & your beautiful family!

    • Thank you so much Frederic. I just love them to pieces. Sometimes I just want to take a bite out of them, they’re so cute. And sometimes I actually do. I tell them they’re love nibbles. Of course not hard though. Hehehe.
      Oh my, that’s awesome. One week in Sicily? I’m sooooooooo jealous. Italy is one of the places in the world that I most want to visit.
      I receive your mediterranean love and pass on some Brazilian love to you too. Have a great time in Sicily.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

  9. your children are so gorgeous and I like your poem (again) πŸ™‚ – and I have lots of thoughts about the stay at home role on our culture – it is not like it used to be in the past and in my experience I have seen it burn a lot of women out if not done right.
    – I am an advocate for it – and I had the privilege of being able to be “available” for my family (with sacrifices at times) and I have also had the honor of taking on part time (sometimes full-time) jobs on and off and I know out kept me fresh and alive – but I was able to share it with my family.

    But I know what you are saying here – many times the society today in the West looks down on the stay at home, or worse – things are set up for needing 2 incomes to survive – and so there is a lot to combat. And I think it all comes down to being available and to being in tune with your family – and while also keeping oneself fresh as an individual too – as a person with needs and all that.

    And I have counseling in my background – but I also have ben a round a few decades and over the years – do you know some of the worse cases of burnout that I have seen? They have been with stay at home moms. So my advice to all woman, is to embrace the honor of being available for the kids entrusted in your care – and for the hubby and any other ministering that God leads – but to also not forget to nurture one’s own needs – because I have seen a few women really struggle in years 6 and 7. I could share more, but it comes down to keeping one self fresh. And for me, working on and off was such a blessing – but the family always came first – and the times i did have to work to bring in some income – or just because God led it – well in hind sight I can see even more how God used that as GIFT to keep me fresh and fully alive.

    Side note – it seems that so many Christian women refer to the woman of Proverbs 31 and yet they miss a lot of what is in this text. This ideal woman – which needs some context to grasp – well this woman works – with and for her household – she “considers a field and buys it” – and I have a feeling that she has lots of tired days, but she also stays fresh with using her skills and talents.

    anyhow, to piggy back on Einstein’s quote – well you can;t live for others is your half dead and lifeless while alive – and so I think it takes balance – we give – we serve and we love, love, love – but we also have to keep our cup filled because we are living beings with needs too –

    thanks for a though provoking post – πŸ™‚ ❀

    • Thank you so much for your kind words about my kids. I love them to pieces.
      I like what you’ve brought to the table here. Of course, I am speaking from my own experience, and as someone that lives in a completely different culture and mindset then a lot of the North American world. I’m interested to know how the women who are staying at home are burned out. Especially when their kids are in school all day. Could you share more on this with me, because you have had counseling experience in this and have heard first-hand the issues that western women are going through? Would you say that the burnout comes from societal pressures and worldviews that have influenced their ways of thinking and mindsets? Or maybe because they aren’t taking care of themselves as well, as you said, keeping fresh by using their own gifts, abilities and interests as well?
      “I know out kept me fresh and alive”
      –Oh yes, I believe that it is so important for a woman to be involved in something that is for her as well. Like for me. I have always been involved in the arts. I sang, danced, acted, taught in these areas even. Now-a-day I am branching out in the area of poetry and am interested in exploring my creative side with paint and artsy stuff. How that will come about, I’m not quite sure yet. Plus, being certified in fitness and nutrition, I am big on getting physical exercise. I am also very big on needing my quiet time for prayer, reading and reflection. In Brazil, the children go to school either all morning or all afternoon. So my kids study in the afternoon, and in the morning I am with them. I am teaching them both to read in English, being that their school is all in Portuguese. They get home at about 6:00 pm, have dinner, play a bit, maybe shower, go to bed. I don’t find it stressful at all, mainly because my hubby and I share chores and all, plus he is very present in their lives.
      I used to have a really twisted idea of what it meant to be a woman and what it meant to be a mother, raising children. Growing up in Canada, and not in a Christian, but broken home, my surroundings, experiences and culture really shaped a worldview in me that was totally warped. After becoming a Christian, I never bought this whole idea of Biblical woman, instead had a real bone to pick with macho men and an attitude that said, “I am woman, hear me roar”. I was bitter towards the whole, ‘woman is not equal to man and the way that many women were seen, or whatever. It wasn’t until I was in India for a stint, when I would walk in the mornings and listen to podcasts on my mp3 player. God absolutely ripped all of the wrong thought patterns out of my head and showed me the worth there is in being a woman and in being a mother. I used to hate the idea of the ‘happy family’ sitting around the dinner table and going to the park with kids. The whole idea of that was disgusting to me. Now, there is nothing more that I desire than to be a strong influence in my children’s lives, and to raise them with the culture that we’ve established in our home, in a way that they will be loved, encouraged, accepted, forgiven, etc. That they would grow up to be healthy in every way – physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually. My hope is that we are able to raise them to be secure in who they are in this world and who they are in the sight of God.
      “It seems that so many Christian women refer to the woman of Proverbs 31 and yet they miss a lot of what is in this text. This ideal woman – which needs some context to grasp – well this woman works – with and for her household – she β€œconsiders a field and buys it” – and I have a feeling that she has lots of tired days, but she also stays fresh with using her skills and talents.”
      –I think much of the problem lies with the possibility of Christian woman not contextualizing the scripture. Like for today, and how that looks today. And for the culture that this was written in. And yes, definitely keeping fresh by using her gifts, skills and talents. Here here to that.
      Thanks again Prior. Great input here.
      πŸ™‚

      • Thanks for your nice reply – and let me tell you – I wish I had the time to read your comment section – boy do i – and I do not say that on a lot of blogs – but this post especially has some meaty comments – and I am really glad to be here by the way. πŸ™‚

        and with some of the specific cases of burnout I have seen – a few were homeschooling moms, and some had their kids in regular school. and in my text – I had a typo – I meant to say that my time “out working” not just time “out”.. ha!

        I have so many examples I do not even know where to begin (would go nicely into a book – ha) – but I actually study work and study work motivation – and about ten years ago I read a life changing book (called Skillful Means) by a non-Christian counselor who suggested that “balanced work” is the answer for most things.
        And the burnout and depression I have seen in moms (and others) usually all comes from ongoing imbalance. But to find balance – it depends on the person.

        The mom who is working 5 long days a week may need to be at home for a couple of years and then work part-time once she gets caught up on sleep. The mom who is at home all the time may need to work one or two days to stimulate a different side of her because staying at home only pulls from one set of skills. Other women are sick in their gut (really – because all of life is off when the body is off). And some women are misunderstanding the Scriptures (as you note!) and they give from depletion or they are not in a healthy marriage that Validates both partners equally – we are different genders, but equal – and then we grow into different roles as we spiritually mature. But I digress…..

        …
        I think it all comes down to boundaries and balance – one lady who I met up with for a very short “prayer and share” meet up – (a group of 4 women we met 3 times at a coffee place) well the last meet up was just she and I – and during that time she shared how her depression meds were not working anymore. This did not surprise me because back when we lived in San Jose I was shocked to find that MOST of the key women in our church community were on prescription meds for depression. yikes.

        anyhow, I knew this lady only a little, but enough to make a few suggestions. Her husband is a very wealthy provider and so working was not even in a thought for her. Her kids were in school, they had a maid and she had help – so that kind of exhaustion and burnout was not a problem either. But as she shared, I remembered that book – and I suggested a few things about intestinal cleansing, but I also asked her if she ever though of working part-time. She took a small job as a reading specialist and it was a key help for her. And PTL because that was many years ago and she is still in this same school district and has been a huge blessing to elementary kids.

        ~~~

        anyhow, it sounds like you have a nice balance to keep your fresh – yes it does – πŸ™‚ ❀

      • Oh wow. This was great. It’s after midnight here so I’m going to read it again tomorrow, and comment back.
        πŸ™‚ ❀

  10. Your kids are soooo cute!

    I don’t think that a woman is β€˜throwing her life away’ by staying with her children and investing in their good. Neither do I think that a woman who works away from home and has others care for her children is ‘throwing her life away’. We’re different and ‘fulfillment’ looks different for each one of us. I do believe though, that a great deal of fulfillment comes from serving the interest of others.

    I would tend to respectfully disagree with your opinion: “A life with far less stress and rushing about. A life of more tranquility, peace and fulfillment in what I invest in.”

    In my view, this is romanticizing the ‘stay-at-home mom life.’ I stayed at home for many years caring for my kids. I wouldn’t change it, but I wouldn’t say it was far less stress and rushing about, etc, etc.

    Our lives are like art, yes!

    • Hi Timi. Thank you so much for your kind words about my kids. I think they’re little cuties too. πŸ™‚
      I like what Audrey said in her comment, β€œI’m a fan of any choice a woman makes if she’s doing it for the right reasons.” I think that’s the key. Doing what you do with the right reasons. And doing what you do, because you know it’s right and best for you and your family.
      I think it’s great that you stayed home with your kids for many years and wouldn’t change it. However, imagine if you didn’t stay home and instead went to work. Then still having to do all that you did when you did stay at home with them. Wouldn’t you say your life would have been way more hectic and rushed?
      I’m not trying to romanticize staying at home with kids at all. I know it’s a tough job, and at times can get very stressful, especially when you have a special needs child. What I am saying is that, I’m not about to go out and work just because society dictates I must in order to be ‘someone’ in this world. Or also, so that I can have more money and buy more stuff, because that’s important and valuable to me. What I am saying is that I value raising my kids and influencing their lives. That I want to be there for them, because I consider it a huge responsibility to shape and form individuals into healthy, responsible individuals.
      There’s this one blogger, Kenneth from Culturemonk.com that I follow. He wrote a post some time ago about a barista that had decided to quit her job so that she could be home with her kids. The way people reacted to her choice was what really impacted me. People thought she was throwing her life away. She felt the need to explain herself, that she was going to get her masters (or something like that). Funny thing how culture really shapes the mentality of a people, wouldn’t you say? And then some people just get downright nasty and fundamentalist about the whole issue. As if to say that women that stay home with their kids are just ridiculous and are throwing their lives away. Hmmmmmmmm. I used to feel somewhat the same way. Over time, God really changed (literally transformed) my way of thinking. I couldn’t be happier now. I don’t have my kids in tons of programs. We don’t rush all over the place for this lesson and that practice. We just live very simple lives and have a established a really unique and special culture within our own home.
      Thanks again Timi, and yes our lives (and lives we form) are works of art.
      πŸ™‚

  11. Lovely pic there, Staci!

    You and the big questions! lol

    I can’t offer much in the stay-at-home-mother discussion. I think it’s different for all women / families. Some are culturally pulled that way by design, others are not, and everyone sees it in a different light. To thine own self be true, methinks. I don’t think any sort of noble work can be seen as throwing anything away, ya know? I do feel though that staying at home (which I did for a bit years ago with the baby) has its own stresses. Frankly, there are times I enjoy going to work, as I get a break. (I joke with my wife that I am going to work to “relax”!)

    As for painting our lives – well that’s our choice in many ways, but I align it with God’s will as much as I can. Do I fail? Absolutely. I allow ego to get in the way often and paint outside the lines. Or another canvas all together!

    Love the post, Staci. Always deep thoughts.

    Paul

    • Awwww, thanks Paul. My babes. I think they’re sooo cute, I could just take a bite out of them. hehehe.
      Hahahaha, yea, I guess you’re not a mother eh. But hey, kudos to you for staying home with the baby for a while. And I love that: “I’m going to work, as I get a break.”
      I like how you said, To thine own self be true. Just like Audrey’s comment. I like what she said about being a fan of a woman making her choice, so longing she’s doing it for the right reasons. Is she going to work because of societal pressure to ‘be’ someone (as if being a mother wasn’t worth anything)? Is she doing so because she values affluence above her children? Don’t get me wrong. I know that with todays economy and how expensive life seems to be, two incomes are often required. I consider myself privileged to be able to invest in my kiddies lives and form true works of art.
      There you go again with your ego πŸ™‚ Hehehe. Just kidding with you. We all fail, my friend. And hey, what’s life without painting outside the lines a bit hey?

      Thanks again Paul. By the way, I started listening to your podcast. It’s pretty long though so I stopped part way. I will have to continue, maybe tonight. Hubby will be traveling.

      Big hug
      πŸ™‚

  12. Motherhood is both beautiful and important for society. I don’t think any woman would be “throwing away” her life if she chose to stay home and take care of her children. Life can only not be fulfilling if you are not content with the decisions you make in life. As long as you make the decisions you want to make you should be fulfilled, and until the end there is always time to change our path. It seems to me you’re a wonderful woman and a wonderful mother. Hope you’re having a great start to your week! Thanks for sharing this one. An interesting post as always!

    • Awwww, thanks Benjamin. That’s so sweet of you to say. I try to do my best, but I am human. I have my good days and bad days. Just ask my kids. Sometimes I have to ask them for forgiveness because of my attitudes or yelling.
      By the way, I just noticed that your gravatar says, ‘Bejamin’. Is it suppose to without an ‘n’?
      πŸ™‚

      • You’re welcome. Doing your best, is the best! Human is is a great thing to be these days when we have so many of us not acting like humans. You sound very reasonable to me.

        And yes, it’s Bejamin on purpose. In second grade the n fell off on my name tag for some reason and people started calling me Bejamin. It stuck for a while, but I still prefer Benjamin.

        Have a wonderful wonderful night!

      • Thank you so much Benjamin. I love that you mentioned doing our best is the best. I was just recently thinking about perfection, and how it’s literally unattainable. And then I was thinking about perfection, and how doing our best, with what we have, and not out of selfish ambition or in an ego-centric way, that that is what perfection is. So your words have come at a very timely moment, my friend. Just confirming what I already believe.

        Hahaha. That’s funny about your name. It’s funny how it also stuck. How long for? I also prefer ‘Benjamin’. It’s such a nice name.

        You have a great night, full of deep sleep and sweet dreams.
        πŸ™‚

  13. Beautifully written, nice quotes…life lived for others worth living a life. Lovely kids, they are our love of life…yes life is an magical form of art. Our activities and thinking paints new chapter in our everyday life.

    • What a great comment Nihar. Thank you so much for your kind words and input.
      I love Einstein quotes. Even more so that he was considered as possibly having Asperger’s Syndrome, just like my seven year old son.
      I also like the way you think about our lives (thinking and actions) paints a new chapter every day that we live.
      Thanks again Nihar.
      πŸ™‚

      • My pleasure!!!
        I also like the quotes from Einstein, here is one “Imagination is more powerful than Knowledge”…such a profound thought, a genius like him can think this way…
        Don’t worry about your son, he will be a genius, life gives us surprises in different way, something we don’t have control or say, we get upset. Humbly accepting what we have got and have no control to change, if we do so we usher beautiful times ahead for ourselves…
        Lovely hearing your thoughts, looking forward to more of your beautiful views…

      • Ohhhhh, yes I love that quote too. He truly was a genius. Did you know that he was fired from a job once because he was unable to do the math to give proper change? Even he admitted that his abilities in math were horrible.
        Thank you so much for the encouragement Nihar. I think my son is amazing just the way he is, and I believe there are great things in store for him.
        Thank you for such kind words. I’m humbled. I will be checking out your blog tomorrow as well. It’s past midnight here and I’m off to bed. Until tomorrow.
        πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

      • Yes, I am…yes, he did see all the rejections in life, he accept with humility and that’s where he created his own destiny.
        Just keep your faith intact, rest will always be beautiful in life…It is a real pleasure to be interacting with you…looking forward to your perspectives.
        By the way wonderful morning here… Good Night!!!

  14. It’s interesting that you wrote about this, Staci. I have a poem posting later on today that is in the same vein as what you posted here. I do think our lives are works of art created by the Lord. I’m always in awe of stay at home moms! And to be honest, I think if more mom’s were able to stay home with their kids our society would be very different. I grew up in a time where a majority of mom’s stayed home with their children. It was a very nurturing environment. We didn’t have a bunch of money, but we had a sense of family where we all ate together at meal times. No television, simply good old conversation about our days. When we traveled we talked and played games with the entire family. Technology didn’t rule our lives. It was a different lifestyle than today. Your kids will truly benefit with the time that you’ve chosen to spend with them! Beautiful post!

    • What a beautiful story Kirsten, and thank you for sharing it with me.
      “I think if more mom’s were able to stay home with their kids our society would be very different.”
      –I agree. I used to have a real problem, like twisted mindset when it came to being a woman and child-rearing. I used to think of the stay-at-home mom as not being able to be fulfilled in life, and that it was unfair. Boy was I wrong. When we were living in India for a short stint, God really started to rip out those crazy ideas and showed me how it is such a blessing being a woman, and being a mother. I didn’t have the best upbringing, so that, along with society and culture, helped to shape the twisted way of thinking. I now consider it a privilege to be able to stay with them and invest in their lives. I also think that kids learn so many things through the close contact with family that they won’t learn at school. Life things, you know.
      Thank you so much for your kind words and encouragement. I really appreciate it, and you.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

  15. Your children are beautiful, and I think one should never let their life be defined by societal conventions but follow the true “convention” of their heart :)…something that you are doing wonderfully! I love the poem ❀ ❀

    • Ohhhh, thank you so much Neha. Yes, I think they’re beautiful too. hehehe πŸ™‚
      And thank you for such kind words. I really appreciate it, and you.
      πŸ™‚ ❀

  16. Your children are adorable and the poem is so lovely!

    I absolutely agree with you – my life is a canvas to me and each day I do my best to use the most beautiful colors and to create a masterpiece! πŸ™‚
    Also, I think your decision to dedicate your life to your family is worth honor! I think that a lot of people underestimate the work, the effort and time you have to put in being a full-time Mom. You deserve to be proud of yourself and I’m sure that growing up your children will appreciate all the time and treasure all the moments they spent with you! πŸ™‚

    • Awwww, thanks so much. What a sweet thing to say. I live in Brazil, and will be moving to a place at the beginning of next year that is like a community setting. There are kids, and like-minded people, which many are already friends of ours. My Aspie son loves it there, so it will definitely be an awesome change in our lives. It also makes it soooo much easier at always being there for them.
      Thanks again Natella.
      πŸ™‚

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s