From Death to Life


From Death to Life

Have you ever considered what it means to live? Did you know that the Greek have three words for our English word, ‘life’? I just recently found that out.

Bios: Physical or biological life.

Psuche: Psychological life of a human. Soul, mind, emotion, will.

Zoe: Absolute fullness of life, spiritual life, the divine life uniquely possessed by God.

Isn’t that amazing? The Greek words go so much deeper. It makes me think about how the physical, psychological (soul, mind, emotion, will) and spiritual are all interconnected. It also seems to answer certain questions I’ve grappled with in the past. Questions about life, death, meaning, purpose, fear of death and what happens when a human dies.

What do you think about these three Greek words, and their meanings?


Photo taken in Ouro Preto, Brazil

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32 thoughts on “From Death to Life

  1. The ancients were more balanced in their beliefs than modern culture is. They intertwined spirituality and science. It was one to them. In our quest to eliminate God, we kneel at the altar of technology and raise man up to be the king.

      • Heyyyyyy Natalie. I also loved this reply from Rob, and I totally agree with you about it being man’s ultimate downfall. Like in my response to Rob, I mentioned that the final outcome can only be chaos. Natalie, have you ever read any of Francis Shaeffer’s books? Very heady and philosophical, but so, so, so very good. He wrote a book called, “How Should We Then Live? The Rise and Decline of Western Thought and Culture”. He also did a five hour documentary on it. I would highly recommend reading it.
        Happy Easter to you, my M friend šŸ™‚
        Hugs and blessings.
        šŸ™‚ ā¤

      • No I haven’t read any of her things. I shall have to see if I can find it. Happy Easter to you and yours as well, Staci, my Mary friend. Hugs, N šŸ™‚ ā¤

    • Oh totally Rob. I love this comment you gave, because it is so true. The funny thing is that there are many Scientists from history that considered themselves Christians: Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton and Boyle (you can read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Christian_thinkers_in_science).
      “In our quest to eliminate God, we kneel at the altar of technology and raise man up to be the king.”
      –The epitomy of humanism. The ultimate outcome can only be chaos.
      Happy Easter Rob.
      šŸ™‚

      • Yes, that’s right. Hey, I’ll be uploading me singing later on. I was asked to do an English version of Amazing Grace at a special function that our missions base did last night. My hubby just used my cell phone, but I thought I’d go ahead an upload it. It’s the first time actually getting out there and singing in over 5 or 6 years. I was totally lacking in confidence before rehearsing earlier on, but as I kept singing, my voice got stronger and stronger. I think I’m going to start singing more. I may even get back to your song and give it a shot again. šŸ˜‰

  2. “It makes me think about how the physical, psychological (soul, mind, emotion, will) and spiritual are all interconnected.”

    This is why we are commanded to love Him with all our heart, mind, soul, and strength. Conversely, when we go out of balance in one area, the imbalance follows in the rest.

    I like the first two stanzas esp, S. Happy Easter.

    • “This is why we are commanded to love Him with all our heart, mind, soul, and strength.”
      Very true. Our life isn’t in fragments, or disconnected. It’s ‘holistic’ ( šŸ™‚ I know you like that word šŸ™‚ )
      “Conversely, when we go out of balance in one area, the imbalance follows in the rest.”
      –Oh yes, yes, yes. You hit the nail on the head here D.
      The first two stanzas are my favorite too. The other three are more focused on “In Him we live, move and have our being.” One stanza on life, one on movement, and the one on being.
      Happy Easter to you and your two guys D.
      šŸ™‚

  3. I think I LOVE Greek! I am always fascinated to read the Bible in its original languages. I have the Key Word Bible that gives me the words and definitions of words in Hebrew and Greek. The English language butchers words. For example, we use the same word “love” to say I love my iPhone and I love my husband. In Greek, the words for love are very specific and use different ones to express the appropriate emotion/intent of the word. I really like how you wrote this poem and then paired it with your picture of stairs – they are perfect together, Staci. As I always, I thoroughly enjoyed your post xoxo

    • Heyyyyy Kirsten. I loooooovvvvveeee going deeper by reading the definitions in the Greek for words that modern English just seems so vague. Oh yes, the four loves in Ancient Greek. In November I did a series on these four loves. And two Valentine’s day’s ago I wrote a post on them as well.
      “I really like how you wrote this poem and then paired it with your picture of stairs”
      –Awwww, thank you so much Kirsten. I’m trying to use my own images now, and really want to grow more and more in photography and using it to interpret (or go with) the poetry. I love minimalist photography and photos that tell a story. I’m so glad you liked this pair together.
      Have a great Easter.
      šŸ™‚ ā¤

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